Research from other organisations

In Emerging Economies, Smartphone and Social Media Users Have Broader Social Networks

Pew Research - Fri, 23/08/2019 - 1:54am

Smartphone users in emerging economies – especially those who use social media – tend to be more exposed to people with different backgrounds and more connected with friends they don’t see in person.

The post In Emerging Economies, Smartphone and Social Media Users Have Broader Social Networks appeared first on Pew Research Center.

In Emerging Economies, Smartphone and Social Media Users Have Broader Social Networks

Pew Research - Fri, 23/08/2019 - 1:49am

Smartphone users in emerging economies – especially those who use social media – tend to be more exposed to people with different backgrounds and more connected with friends they don’t see in person.

The post In Emerging Economies, Smartphone and Social Media Users Have Broader Social Networks appeared first on Pew Research Center.

The Growing Partisan Divide in Views of Higher Education

Pew Research - Tue, 20/08/2019 - 4:00am

Americans see value in higher education whether they graduated from college or not. Even so, there is an undercurrent of dissatisfaction – even suspicion – among the public about the role colleges play in society.

The post The Growing Partisan Divide in Views of Higher Education appeared first on Pew Research Center.

The Growing Partisan Divide in Views of Higher Education

Pew Research - Tue, 20/08/2019 - 3:57am

Americans see value in higher education whether they graduated from college or not. Even so, there is an undercurrent of dissatisfaction – even suspicion – among the public about the role colleges play in society.

The post The Growing Partisan Divide in Views of Higher Education appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Most Democrats Are Excited by ‘Several’ 2020 Candidates – Not Just Their Top Choice

Pew Research - Sat, 17/08/2019 - 5:58am

A majority of Democratic voters who prefer one of the presidential candidates are excited about several candidates vying for the party's nomination. Far fewer are enthused only by their first choice.

The post Most Democrats Are Excited by ‘Several’ 2020 Candidates – Not Just Their Top Choice appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Most Churchgoers Say They Spend Their Day Seeking God

Lifeway Research - Fri, 16/08/2019 - 2:50am

By Aaron Earls

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — American Protestant churchgoers say God is on their mind throughout their day in both intentional and impromptu moments.

The 2019 Discipleship Pathway Assessment study from Nashville-based LifeWay Research identified seeking God as one of eight signposts of spiritual maturity.

About 2 in 3 Americans who regularly attend a Protestant church (67%) disagree with the statement: “Throughout many of my activities I don’t think about God,” with 40% strongly disagreeing.

Fewer (19%) agree or say they neither agree nor disagree (14%).

“A Christian has the opportunity to walk with God,” said Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research. “Most churchgoers affirm their thoughts are on God as they go about life’s activities.”

Women are more likely than men (45% to 33%) to strongly assert they’re thinking about God throughout their day.

Middle-aged churchgoers are more likely to say they think about God during many of their activities. Those age 35 to 49 (42%) and 50 to 64 (46%) are more likely to strongly affirm their constant thoughts of God than those 18 to 34 (33%) and those 65 and older (36%).

African American (55%) and Hispanic churchgoers (51%) are more likely to strongly assert they regularly think about God during the day than white churchgoers (33%) or churchgoers of other ethnicities (32%).

Black Protestants (58%) are more likely than evangelical Protestants (40%) or mainline Protestants (27%) to strongly disagree they don’t think about God throughout many of their activities.

Those who attend worship services at least weekly (41%) are more likely than those who attend less frequently (36%) to strongly disagree.

Intentional moments

Around 2 in 5 churchgoers (38%) say they set aside time for private worship, praise or thanksgiving to God every day.

Another 29% say they do so a few times a week, while 13% set aside the time once a week, 7% a few times a month, 4% once a month, and 9% rarely or never.

“Having an attitude of praise requires noticing who God is and what He is doing. This takes intentionality,” said McConnell. “Once we choose to observe His work, however, the thanks and worship come naturally.”

Female churchgoers (40%) are more likely than their male counterparts (36%) to say they set aside those moments every day.

African Americans (45%) and Hispanics (43%) are also more likely than whites (36%) or other ethnicities (31%) to have specific times for private worship, praise or thanksgiving every day.

Black Protestants (46%) and evangelical Protestants (40%) are more likely than mainline Protestants (29%) to say they have such times daily.

Those who attend church at least weekly (40%) are more likely than those who attend less frequently (33%) to have set aside times for private worship every day.

Impromptu moments

Around three-quarters of Protestant churchgoers (78%) agree they find themselves praying at the spur-of-the-moment throughout the day, with 44% strongly agreeing.

Few disagree (8%), while 14% neither agree nor disagree.

“Who we turn to when we have good or bad news says a lot about our relationships,” said McConnell. “If we immediately want to share life’s ups and downs with God and ask Him for help and guidance, that demonstrates we value our relationship with Him.”

Around half of women who regularly attend a Protestant church (49%) strongly agree they find themselves praying throughout the day, compared to 36% of male churchgoers.

Evangelical Protestants (46%) and black Protestants (45%) are more likely to strongly agree than mainline Protestants (32%).

Those who attend a worship service four times a month or more (46%) are more likely to strongly agree than those who attend less frequently (38%).

“Jesus opened the way for people to enter God’s presence through His death on the cross,” said McConnell. “As individuals respond to Christ’s call, they see Deuteronomy 4:29 fulfilled in their lives—when they seek God with all their soul, they will find Him.”

Aaron Earls is online editor of Facts & Trends and a writer for LifeWay Christian Resources.

Methodology:
The online survey of 2,500 Protestant churchgoers was conducted Jan. 14–29, 2019 and sponsored by the Center for Church Revitalization at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary with funding from the Southern Baptists of Texas. Respondents were screened to include those who identified as Protestant or non-denominational and attend religious services at least once a month. Quotas and slight weights were used to balance gender, age, region, ethnicity, income and denominational affiliation. The completed sample is 2,500 surveys. The sample provides 95% confidence that the sampling error does not exceed plus or minus 2.0%. Margins of error are higher in sub-groups.

Download the research

Older Americans, Black Adults and Americans With Less Education More Interested in Local News

Pew Research - Thu, 15/08/2019 - 1:56am

Nearly a third of U.S. adults (31%) follow local news very closely, but local news does not play an equally vital role for all Americans. Older Americans, black adults and those with a high school education or less show considerably more interest in local news than their counterparts, according to a new analysis from Pew […]

The post Older Americans, Black Adults and Americans With Less Education More Interested in Local News appeared first on Pew Research Center.

An Invitation to Faith for the Future

Barna Blog - Wed, 14/08/2019 - 6:09am

Over the last decade and a half, the Barna team has interviewed nearly 100,000 Millennials and Gen Z teens, listening to the stories and experiences of U.S. young people across the religious spectrum. In order to study the first truly global generation and learn what values and perceptions they’re bringing with them into adulthood, we needed a global partner. We combined our research expertise with the international reach of World Vision, the largest Christian humanitarian organization in the world.

For this study alone, Barna conducted more than 15,000 interviews among 18–35-year-olds across 25 countries and in nine different languages, making this the largest research project we’ve ever undertaken. Our team has been analyzing the data for months, thinking deeply with experts, practitioners and young people around the world about what it means for the Church and beyond.

Initial findings on the young adults whom we call The Connected Generation will be released in Faith for the Future a live, free webcast on September 10, 2019. We hope you will join us.

Faith for the Future will feature:

  • Insights from the research, covering unique pressures and cultural dynamics facing the connected generation; views of religion, Christianity and factors contributing to church engagement; and how to activate the generation for impact and leadership
  • Interviews and commentary from a wide range of voices, including both established and emerging Christian leaders, to help you turn the research into action for your context
  • A great opportunity to bring your entire team together to learn and discuss the implications for your church or organization
  • Practical solutions, drawn from the results of a three-year study for my new book, Faith for Exiles, about what’s working among resilient disciples

Register today to join us for this live event. Everyone who attends will also receive a free chapter from the global research, available to download after the webcast.

We’re prayerfully anticipating all that God will do around the world as we get to know the connected generation together. See you on September 10!

For the next generation,

David Kinnaman
President, Barna Group

The post An Invitation to Faith for the Future appeared first on Barna Group.

An Invitation to Faith for the Future

Barna - Wed, 14/08/2019 - 6:09am

Over the last decade and a half, the Barna team has interviewed nearly 100,000 Millennials and Gen Z teens, listening to the stories and experiences of U.S. young people across the religious spectrum. In order to study the first truly global generation and learn what values and perceptions they’re bringing with them into adulthood, we needed a global partner. We combined our research expertise with the international reach of World Vision, the largest Christian humanitarian organization in the world.

For this study alone, Barna conducted more than 15,000 interviews among 18–35-year-olds across 25 countries and in nine different languages, making this the largest research project we’ve ever undertaken. Our team has been analyzing the data for months, thinking deeply with experts, practitioners and young people around the world about what it means for the Church and beyond.

Initial findings on the young adults whom we call The Connected Generation will be released in Faith for the Future a live, free webcast on September 10, 2019. We hope you will join us.

Faith for the Future will feature:

  • Insights from the research, covering unique pressures and cultural dynamics facing the connected generation; views of religion, Christianity and factors contributing to church engagement; and how to activate the generation for impact and leadership
  • Interviews and commentary from a wide range of voices, including both established and emerging Christian leaders, to help you turn the research into action for your context
  • A great opportunity to bring your entire team together to learn and discuss the implications for your church or organization
  • Practical solutions, drawn from the results of a three-year study for my new book, Faith for Exiles, about what’s working among resilient disciples

Register today to join us for this live event. Everyone who attends will also receive a free chapter from the global research, available to download after the webcast.

We’re prayerfully anticipating all that God will do around the world as we get to know the connected generation together. See you on September 10!

For the next generation,

David Kinnaman
President, Barna Group

The post An Invitation to Faith for the Future appeared first on Barna Group.

U.S. Views of China Turn Sharply Negative Amid Trade Tensions

Pew Research - Wed, 14/08/2019 - 1:57am

Unfavorable opinion of China in the U.S. is at its highest level in 14 years of polling. Americans also increasingly see China as a threat, and more than half see friction in the current bilateral economic relationship.

The post U.S. Views of China Turn Sharply Negative Amid Trade Tensions appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Two-thirds of Churchgoers Say Denying Self is Essential to Serving Christ

Lifeway Research - Fri, 09/08/2019 - 2:50am

By Carol Pipes

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A majority of Protestant churchgoers believe making sacrificial decisions to serve Christ is essential to their faith, and most try to avoid situations that might lead to immoral thoughts or actions.

The 2019 Discipleship Pathway Assessment study from Nashville-based LifeWay Research found two-thirds (66%) of Protestant churchgoers agree with the statement: “A Christian must learn to deny himself or herself to serve Christ,” with 38% strongly agreeing.

Only 6% strongly disagree denying self is essential to serving Christ, while 10% somewhat disagree and 18% neither agree nor disagree.

The study identifies obeying God and denying self as one of eight signposts that consistently show up in the lives of growing Christians.

Researchers found significant statistical differences when it comes to ethnicity, religious tradition, geography and education.

Among Protestant churchgoers, Hispanics are the most likely ethnic group to strongly agree (53%) Christians must deny self to serve Christ.

Evangelical Protestants (44%) and black Protestants (40%) are more likely to strongly agree than mainline Protestants (18%).

Protestant churchgoers in the South (40%) are more likely to strongly agree than those in the Midwest (34%). Those with a high school diploma or less (40%) or with some college education (40%) are more likely to strongly agree than those with a graduate degree (34%).

“Choosing God’s agenda over our own is not natural,” said Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research. “Many churchgoers understand this tradeoff and are willing to say they should deny their own desires to serve God. But most churchgoers also acknowledge they are not completely letting go.”

Researchers also asked Protestant churchgoers if they try to avoid situations in which they might be tempted to think or do immoral things.

Almost 8 in 10 (77%) Protestant churchgoers agree they try to avoid these situations, with 41% strongly agreeing. Another 6% somewhat disagree, while 3% strongly disagree, and 15% neither agree nor disagree.

Female churchgoers are more likely to strongly agree they avoid tempting situations than males (43% vs. 38%).

Protestant churchgoers in the South (44%) are more likely to strongly agree than those in the Northeast (37%) and Midwest (36%).

Evangelical Protestants (44%) and black Protestants (39%) are more likely to strongly agree than mainline Protestants (30%) they avoid situations that might tempt them to think or do immoral things.

Those who attend a worship service four times a month or more are more likely to strongly agree than those who attend less than four times a month (42% vs. 38%).

“Walking with Christ involves our beliefs, desires and actions,” McConnell said. “When it comes to obedience, our desires are reflected in how much we want to obey and are trying to avoid things that may lead us astray. The majority of churchgoers admit they could be trying harder to avoid temptation.”

Two-thirds (66%) of Protestant churchgoers say they live as if they exist to praise and glorify God. A third strongly agrees, with another third somewhat agreeing.

Around 1 in 4 (24%) neither agrees nor disagrees, while 10% disagree they live as if they exist to praise and glorify God.

Hispanics (50%) and African Americans (43%) are more likely to strongly agree than whites (27%) and other ethnicities (28%).

Black Protestants (43%) and evangelical Protestants (35%) are more likely to strongly agree than mainline Protestants (20%). And those with a high school diploma or less are more likely to strongly agree (38%) they live as if they exist to praise and glorify God than those with more education.

“Being a disciple of Christ is more than a label. It is living out one’s purpose. That purpose is not one we design for ourselves, but one God created for us,” McConnell said. “Obeying God brings glory to God.”

Obeying God and denying self is one of eight signposts measured in the Discipleship Pathway Assessment, which measures an individual’s spiritual growth and addressed in LifeWay’s Bible Studies for Life curriculum. For more information, visit DiscipleshipPathwayAssessment.com.

Carol Pipes is director of corporate communications for LifeWay Christian Resources.

Methodology:
The online survey of 2,500 Protestant churchgoers was conducted Jan. 14–29, 2019. Respondents were screened to include those who identified as Protestant or non-denominational and attend religious services at least once a month. Quotas and slight weights were used to balance gender, age, region, ethnicity, income and denominational affiliation. The completed sample is 2,500 surveys. The sample provides 95% confidence that the sampling error does not exceed plus or minus 2.0%. Margins of error are higher in sub-groups.

Download the research

Churchgoers Hold Conflicting Views on the Need for Other Christians

Lifeway Research - Tue, 06/08/2019 - 2:50am

By Aaron Earls

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Protestant churchgoers say they can walk with God just fine by themselves, but they also say they need other believers to help them do it.

A LifeWay Research survey sponsored by the Center for Church Revitalization at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary finds majorities of those who attend U.S. Protestant or non-denominational churches at least monthly agree with the two sentiments that are seemingly in conflict.

Three in 4 Protestant churchgoers (75%) say they need other believers to help them to grow in their walk with God, with 38% strongly agreeing.

Around 1 in 10 disagree (11%), while 14% neither agree nor disagree.

Despite that, 65% of Protestant churchgoers say they can walk with God without other believers, with 36% agreeing strongly.

One in 5 (20%) disagree and 15% aren’t sure.

According to Kenneth Priest, interim director of the Center for Church Revitalization at Southwestern, those two statements are contradictory, and churches need to help those in the pew recognize the conflict.

“I believe this is primarily a discipleship issue,” Priest said. One factor he said has led to a “spiritual apathy” in the pews is “the lack of pastors and spiritual leaders equipped to effectively preach and teach a text-driven life application of God’s Word.”

This lack of discipleship, Priest said, has caused many churchgoers to be confused or even to see the church as irrelevant to meet their spiritual needs. “The ‘needing, yet not needing’ responses demonstrate an internal turmoil of individuals desiring community, but not seeing the church as the place to have those needs met,” he said.

Some specific groups of churchgoers are more likely to say they need other believers to help them grow in their walk with God.

Those attending church in the South (41%) are more likely to strongly agree than those attending in the Midwest (35%) or the Northeast (33%).

Younger churchgoers, those 18 to 34 (41%) and those 35 to 49 (40%), are more likely to strongly agree than churchgoers 65 and older (34%).

Evangelical Protestants (42%) and black Protestants (37%) are more likely to strongly agree than mainline Protestants (28%).

“Seeing the value other believers can add comes easily for many churchgoers,” said Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research. “But less than half of them also acknowledge their dependence on other believers. The biblical metaphor of the body illustrates that believers should both value and depend on each other.”

Other believers see their faith as more of a solo act.

Women (38%) are more likely to strongly agree than men (33%) that they can walk with God without other believers.

African Americans (50%) are most likely to strongly agree.

Priest said Christians who believe they can walk with God without others are missing out on something essential to their growth as a disciple of Jesus.

“Solo Christianity is an inward desire to seek after spiritual matters without the realization biblical community is what will fulfill the desire they are seeking,” he said.

“Americans don’t like to admit they can’t do things themselves. That is true of Christians as well,” said McConnell. “One’s walk with God should include dependence on God and mutual dependence among believers.”

Aaron Earls is online editor of Facts & Trends and a writer for LifeWay Christian Resources.

Methodology:
The online survey of 2,500 Protestant churchgoers was conducted Jan. 14–29, 2019 and sponsored by the Center for Church Revitalization at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary with funding from the Southern Baptists of Texas. Respondents were screened to include those who identified as Protestant or non-denominational and attend religious services at least once a month. Quotas and slight weights were used to balance gender, age, region, ethnicity, income and denominational affiliation. The completed sample is 2,500 surveys. The sample provides 95% confidence that the sampling error does not exceed plus or minus 2.0%. Margins of error are higher in sub-groups.

Download the research

Australia towards 2030

McCrindle - Mon, 05/08/2019 - 12:00pm

The post Australia towards 2030 appeared first on McCrindle.

Trust and Mistrust in Americans’ Views of Scientific Experts

Pew Research - Sat, 03/08/2019 - 2:07am

Public confidence in scientists is on the upswing, and six-in-ten Americans say scientists should play an active role in policy debates about scientific issues, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

The post Trust and Mistrust in Americans’ Views of Scientific Experts appeared first on Pew Research Center.

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