Research from other organisations

10 Data-Driven Resources to Help Pastors Lead on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Barna Blog - Wed, 15/01/2020 - 6:00pm

In light of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, taking place this year on January 20, Barna wanted to offer a list of resources for pastors and ministry leaders to access in preparation for sermons, programs and community events surrounding the historic significance of this day. MLK Day provides a crucial opportunity for Christians to be ministers of healing and justice, and we hope the years’ worth of Barna research offered below may be helpful as you and your ministry continue to understand the context of the conversations surrounding racism, social justice and reconciliation taking place around the country and within the Church.

  1. Half of Practicing Christians Say History of Slavery Still Impacts the U.S.

Barna asked respondents whether they agree the history of slavery in the U.S. still has a significant impact on black Americans today. Half of practicing Christians (50%) “mostly or totally” acknowledge ongoing repercussions, slightly ahead of the proportion of the general population who feel this way (46%). Just over a quarter of practicing Christians (28%) says the U.S. has moved past this shameful part of its history, also on par with the national average (28%).

  1. What Is the Church’s Role in Racial Reconciliation?

How should the Church respond in light of our nation’s 400-year history of injustices against black people? Though responses were fairly distributed, and multiple responses were allowed, 28 percent of practicing Christians say “there’s nothing the Church should do.” A full third of white practicing Christians (33%) selects this option, double the percentage of black practicing Christians who feel this way (15%). Instead, the plurality of black respondents (33%) has a clear next step in mind: repairing the damage.

  1. U.S. Adults Believe Hate Speech Has Increased—Mainly Online

A large majority of American adults says the amount of hate crime and hate speech (meaning, speech or crimes that are motivated by racial, sexual or other prejudice) has changed in the past five years; seven in 10 (70%) say this behavior has increased. Most attribute the change to the fact that politicians are encouraging or feeding this trend (65%). Similar majorities say social media and the internet have amplified it (62%) or that it is driven by America becoming increasingly more divided as a country (61%). More than half say the internet has provided a forum for hate groups to multiply (57%), that hate crime has increased because the news has drawn attention to it (54%) or even that it has become more socially acceptable to publicly treat others with prejudice (51%). Four in 10 believe increased diversity in America has caused fear or prejudice (37%). Only a few respondents say religious organizations amplify hatred (16%).

  1. Q&A on Racial Reconciliation with David Bailey

David M. Bailey is the founder and executive director of Arrabon, a ministry that equips churches and organizations to engage in the ministry of reconciliation with cultural intelligence. He is an active speaker, consultant and strategist for many national organizations. In an interview with Barna for 2017’s The State of Pastors project, Bailey offers wisdom about acknowledging cultural blind spots in ministry.

  1. Racial Divides in Spiritual Practice

Why do lingering divisions exist in the Church, the very communities built on the promise of forgiveness and reconciliation? Finding racial unity in a congregation is a complex task that requires a deep recognition of racial differences in how Christians understand and express their faith. Here, Barna examines the divergent ways in which black and white Christians approach discipleship, individually and collectively.

  1. Latasha Morrison on Racial Tension, Reconciliation and the Church

In 2017, Latasha Morrison, a bridge-builder, reconciler, fellow abolitionist and compelling voice in the fight for racial justice, sat down with Mark Matlock to talk about her book, Be the Bridge: Pursuing God’s Heart for Racial Reconciliation. When asked about the Church’s role in racial reconciliation, Latasha notes, “I think the Church is supposed to be a place of healing and a distinctive and transformative voice in this conversation, but instead, as the Church, we’re seeing that we’re actually a part of the problem—we’re bringing chaos, turmoil and hurt into a lot of the conversations, versus healing and restoration. I think a lot of this is because we have centered the conversation on politics versus the message of Jesus, the gospel…. We need to start [the conversation] with Jesus and end with Jesus.”

  1. Black Lives Matter and Racial Tension in America

In 2016, as Black Lives Matter gained momentum, a Barna study showed the movement was met with a mixed response. Millennials were most likely to support the message of Black Lives Matter (45%), but this support decreased with age (24% among Gen X, 20% among Boomers and 15% among Elders). The outliers were evangelicals and Republicans (especially compared to Democrats), both of which were significantly less likely than the general population to support the movement (13% of evangelicals and 7% of Republicans compared to 27% of all adults).

  1. Americans’ Views of Police Brutality

Also in 2016, Barna found that a slim majority of Americans agreed that police unfairly target people of color and other minority groups. More than half of all adults (53%) either somewhat or strongly agreed with the statement. Barna also asked about individual experience—whether respondents personally live in fear of police brutality. Most (78%) said they either probably or definitely do not live in fear of police brutality. The deepest divides though—for both questions—exist along lines of generation, ethnicity and religion.

  1. Learn About a Globally Minded Generation Longing to Address Injustice

On September 10, 2019, The Connected Generation project launched with the Faith for the Future webcast, a live, free event where leaders from Barna and World Vision revealed main findings—some sobering, some hopeful—uncovered by this global study. The team was joined by panels of experts and ministers as well as viewers from 88 countries and six continents. One of the key findings from this study uncovered the connected generation’s concern about issues such as racism and inequality, and offered insights on how the pursuit of justice factors into their identity and spirituality.

  1. Where Do We Go from Here?

This special report assesses the nation’s reputation of racism, past and present. Through articles, infographics and commentary, Where Do We Go from Here? is intended to bring context to important conversations and contribute to a broader understanding of race relations in our present moment.

Feature image by Joshua J. Cotten on Unsplash

The post 10 Data-Driven Resources to Help Pastors Lead on Martin Luther King Jr. Day appeared first on Barna Group.

10 Data-Driven Resources to Help Pastors Lead on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Barna - Wed, 15/01/2020 - 6:00pm

In light of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, taking place this year on January 20, Barna wanted to offer a list of resources for pastors and ministry leaders to access in preparation for sermons, programs and community events surrounding the historic significance of this day. MLK Day provides a crucial opportunity for Christians to be ministers of healing and justice, and we hope the years’ worth of Barna research offered below may be helpful as you and your ministry continue to understand the context of the conversations surrounding racism, social justice and reconciliation taking place around the country and within the Church.

  1. Half of Practicing Christians Say History of Slavery Still Impacts the U.S.

Barna asked respondents whether they agree the history of slavery in the U.S. still has a significant impact on black Americans today. Half of practicing Christians (50%) “mostly or totally” acknowledge ongoing repercussions, slightly ahead of the proportion of the general population who feel this way (46%). Just over a quarter of practicing Christians (28%) says the U.S. has moved past this shameful part of its history, also on par with the national average (28%).

  1. What Is the Church’s Role in Racial Reconciliation?

How should the Church respond in light of our nation’s 400-year history of injustices against black people? Though responses were fairly distributed, and multiple responses were allowed, 28 percent of practicing Christians say “there’s nothing the Church should do.” A full third of white practicing Christians (33%) selects this option, double the percentage of black practicing Christians who feel this way (15%). Instead, the plurality of black respondents (33%) has a clear next step in mind: repairing the damage.

  1. U.S. Adults Believe Hate Speech Has Increased—Mainly Online

A large majority of American adults says the amount of hate crime and hate speech (meaning, speech or crimes that are motivated by racial, sexual or other prejudice) has changed in the past five years; seven in 10 (70%) say this behavior has increased. Most attribute the change to the fact that politicians are encouraging or feeding this trend (65%). Similar majorities say social media and the internet have amplified it (62%) or that it is driven by America becoming increasingly more divided as a country (61%). More than half say the internet has provided a forum for hate groups to multiply (57%), that hate crime has increased because the news has drawn attention to it (54%) or even that it has become more socially acceptable to publicly treat others with prejudice (51%). Four in 10 believe increased diversity in America has caused fear or prejudice (37%). Only a few respondents say religious organizations amplify hatred (16%).

  1. Q&A on Racial Reconciliation with David Bailey

David M. Bailey is the founder and executive director of Arrabon, a ministry that equips churches and organizations to engage in the ministry of reconciliation with cultural intelligence. He is an active speaker, consultant and strategist for many national organizations. In an interview with Barna for 2017’s The State of Pastors project, Bailey offers wisdom about acknowledging cultural blind spots in ministry.

  1. Racial Divides in Spiritual Practice

Why do lingering divisions exist in the Church, the very communities built on the promise of forgiveness and reconciliation? Finding racial unity in a congregation is a complex task that requires a deep recognition of racial differences in how Christians understand and express their faith. Here, Barna examines the divergent ways in which black and white Christians approach discipleship, individually and collectively.

  1. Latasha Morrison on Racial Tension, Reconciliation and the Church

In 2017, Latasha Morrison, a bridge-builder, reconciler, fellow abolitionist and compelling voice in the fight for racial justice, sat down with Mark Matlock to talk about her book, Be the Bridge: Pursuing God’s Heart for Racial Reconciliation. When asked about the Church’s role in racial reconciliation, Latasha notes, “I think the Church is supposed to be a place of healing and a distinctive and transformative voice in this conversation, but instead, as the Church, we’re seeing that we’re actually a part of the problem—we’re bringing chaos, turmoil and hurt into a lot of the conversations, versus healing and restoration. I think a lot of this is because we have centered the conversation on politics versus the message of Jesus, the gospel…. We need to start [the conversation] with Jesus and end with Jesus.”

  1. Black Lives Matter and Racial Tension in America

In 2016, as Black Lives Matter gained momentum, a Barna study showed the movement was met with a mixed response. Millennials were most likely to support the message of Black Lives Matter (45%), but this support decreased with age (24% among Gen X, 20% among Boomers and 15% among Elders). The outliers were evangelicals and Republicans (especially compared to Democrats), both of which were significantly less likely than the general population to support the movement (13% of evangelicals and 7% of Republicans compared to 27% of all adults).

  1. Americans’ Views of Police Brutality

Also in 2016, Barna found that a slim majority of Americans agreed that police unfairly target people of color and other minority groups. More than half of all adults (53%) either somewhat or strongly agreed with the statement. Barna also asked about individual experience—whether respondents personally live in fear of police brutality. Most (78%) said they either probably or definitely do not live in fear of police brutality. The deepest divides though—for both questions—exist along lines of generation, ethnicity and religion.

  1. Learn About a Globally Minded Generation Longing to Address Injustice

On September 10, 2019, The Connected Generation project launched with the Faith for the Future webcast, a live, free event where leaders from Barna and World Vision revealed main findings—some sobering, some hopeful—uncovered by this global study. The team was joined by panels of experts and ministers as well as viewers from 88 countries and six continents. One of the key findings from this study uncovered the connected generation’s concern about issues such as racism and inequality, and offered insights on how the pursuit of justice factors into their identity and spirituality.

  1. Where Do We Go from Here?

This special report assesses the nation’s reputation of racism, past and present. Through articles, infographics and commentary, Where Do We Go from Here? is intended to bring context to important conversations and contribute to a broader understanding of race relations in our present moment.

Feature image by Joshua J. Cotten on Unsplash

The post 10 Data-Driven Resources to Help Pastors Lead on Martin Luther King Jr. Day appeared first on Barna Group.

Pastors Don’t Link World Events to Speeding up Return of Christ

Lifeway Research - Wed, 15/01/2020 - 4:50am

By Aaron Earls

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Like everyone else, U.S. Protestant pastors may have been closely watching the recent events related to Iran, but probably not because they thought it had anything to do with the return of Christ.

Pastors are more than three times as likely to believe Christians can speed up the return of Christ by the spread of their faith than by backing certain geo-political changes, according to a new study from Nashville-based LifeWay Research.

“While Scripture specifically says we cannot know the day or the hour of Jesus Christ’s return, we were interested in pastors’ views on whether Christians can play a role in bringing about that return any sooner,” explained Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research.

Around 1 in 8 Protestant pastors (12%) believe Christians can speed up the second coming of Jesus by supporting geo-political changes mentioned in the Bible, with 5% strongly agreeing.

Eight in 10 pastors don’t believe their support will have an impact on the timetable of Christ’s return, including 61% who strongly disagree.

During heightened conflicts with Syria, a 2013 LifeWay Research study found many Americans were likely to link global conflict with end times.

Almost 1 in 3 saw the conflict as part of the Bible’s plan for the end times. One in 4 thought a U.S. military strike in Syria could lead to Armageddon. And 1 in 5 believed the world would end in their lifetime, including 32% of evangelicals.

“A large majority of pastors do not see biblical prophecies about future changes among nations as a roadmap for advocating specific international engagement,” said McConnell.

In the most recent study of Protestant pastors, there is no significant difference between mainline and evangelical pastors regarding their views about international political affairs speeding up the return of Christ. There are, however, differences among ethnicities.

White pastors (11%) are less likely to believe backing geo-political events will hasten Jesus’ second coming than African American pastors (20%) or pastors of other ethnicities (22%).

Pastors 65 and older (16%) are more likely to agree than younger pastors, those 18 to 44 (9%).

Additional education decreases the likelihood a pastor agrees that support from Christians of geo-political events will speed up the return of Christ. Pastors without a college degree are more than twice as likely to agree as those with a bachelor’s or master’s degree—22% to 10%.

Evangelism to end times

In what Christians call the Great Commission (Matthew 28:19-20), Jesus tells his followers to “make disciples of all nations,” which is often understood as a command to spread the faith to all distinct people groups.

Previously in Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus connects this occurring to his second coming. “This good news of the kingdom will be proclaimed in all the world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come” (Matthew 24:14 CSB).

Protestant pastors are split, however, on whether Christians can actually speed up the return of Christ by helping to share the gospel with all people groups.

Close to 2 in 5 (41%) believe Christians can hasten Jesus’ second coming through world evangelism, while around half (54%) disagree.

“The Great Commission was a task Jesus gave his followers to be doing while he is gone,” said McConnell. “Four in 10 pastors believe the pace of sharing the message of what Jesus has done will impact the timing of Christ’s return. Presumably many of those who disagree would assert exclusively divine control over Christ’s return.”

Denominationally, Pentecostal pastors (66%) are the most likely to agree Christians can speed up Jesus’ return by sharing the gospel with all people groups.

Those with no college degree (56%) are more likely to agree than those with additional degrees.

Pastors 65 and older are the age group most likely to agree (52%).

White pastors are more likely than African American pastors to disagree that the second coming of Christ can be sped up by global evangelism—55% to 43%.

Immoral until the end?

Whenever the second coming of Christ may be, most Protestant pastors believe immorality will be more common until Jesus returns.

Almost 7 in 10 (68%) agree “culture will increasingly get less moral until Jesus Christ returns.” Around a quarter (26%) disagree.

Evangelical pastors (80%) are far more likely to agree than mainline pastors (51%). Pastors 45 and older (71%) are more likely to agree than younger pastors (62%).

Again, education plays a role in pastors’ likelihood to agree. Those with no college degree (90%) or a bachelor’s degree (81%) are more likely to believe immorality will increase until the return of Jesus than those with a master’s degree (61%) or a doctoral degree (63%).

Baptist (86%) and Pentecostal (84%) pastors are more likely to agree than Church of Christ (67%), Lutheran (59%), Methodist (48%), or Presbyterian and Reformed pastors (45%).

“On the surface, the responses of most pastors could be described as feeling helpless regarding these specific aspects of the future,” said McConnell. “Yet the persistence of their faith amidst a lack of control points to an even greater level of hope.”

Aaron Earls is online editor of Facts & Trends and a writer for LifeWay Christian Resources.

Methodology:
The phone survey of 1,000 Protestant pastors was conducted from Aug. 30 to Sept. 24, 2019. The calling list was a stratified random sample drawn from a list of all Protestant churches. Quotas were used for church size.

Each interview was conducted with the senior pastor, minister or priest of the church called. Responses were weighted by region to more accurately reflect the population. The completed sample is 1,000 surveys. The sample provides 95% confidence that the sampling error does not exceed plus or minus 3.3%. Margins of error are higher in sub-groups.

Download the research

Tracking the Growth and Decline of Religious Segments: The Rise of Atheism

Barna Blog - Tue, 14/01/2020 - 6:00pm

For over 30 years, the Church has trusted Barna’s data and insights to help leaders know their city and effectively minister within their context. While in years past Barna offered printed reports on cities, states and the nation, all of this data plus more is now housed on FaithView, an online Barna tool that allows subscribers to sort, filter and extract custom data specific to their mission and relevant to their area.

One of FaithView’s key features is data tracking, offering users a look at religious trends recorded by Barna over the last 18 years and providing invaluable insights into the growth and decline of various segmentations, whether filtered by generation, denomination, faith segments and more.

In recent reports, Barna (and other researchers) have noted that Christianity is on a steady decline while Americans’ identification with atheism continues to increase. Barna tracking data show that in 2003, just a little over one in 10 Americans claimed to be atheist, agnostic or of no religion (“none”) (11%), while over eight in 10 identified as Christian (across Barna’s faith segments, this included 7% evangelicals, 33% non-evangelical born again and 41% nominal Christians) and less than one in 10 affiliated with other faiths (8%).

Percentage points for all religious segments saw little to no shift over a decade, from 2003 to 2012—but by 2018, Christianity in the United States had witnessed a significant loss of followers, from 81 percent in 2003 to 72 percent in 2018. Meanwhile, the atheist / agnostic / none segment has seen the greatest increase of all groups analyzed, nearly doubling in size from 11 percent in 2003 to 21 percent in 2018.

Note: FaithView tracking data offers analytics in three-year bundles, as seen in the chart above, with the last year included in the bundled labeling the group. This allows Barna to offer a more robust sample size and effectively note data trends and changes over the years.

So, what is leading Americans to shy away from not only Christianity but other religions as well?

Barna has identified a number of trends that might attribute to this move toward secularization, which may spark concern for the spiritual well-being of the next generation. Among young adults, Gen Z teens are much less likely to assert religious identity than generations before them; some of the rise in atheism could be attributed to Gen Z entering adulthood, and the fact that they are, thus far, significantly more likely than older generations to claim no faith. Additionally, faith-sharing is falling out of favor with younger adults, even religious ones; almost half of practicing Christian Millennials (47%) believe that evangelism is wrong. Across the generations, three in 10 Gen X (27%) and one in five Boomers (19%) and Elders (20%) share this sentiment.

In a Q&A published in Reviving Evangelism, a Barna report conducted in partnership with Alpha USA, Dr. Mary Healy, Professor of Scripture at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, notes, “Many people in our time are affected by a kind of spiritual numbness. Beginning from childhood, they’ve been overstimulated, over-scheduled, over-indulged and overexposed to sexual content. They’ve been taught that self-fulfillment, sexual freedom and economic success are the highest values. So, they often seem to have lost interest in the most important questions of life: Why do I exist? What is my mission in life and how do I fulfill it? What is true love and how do I find it?”

“Many people today show indifference to these deeper questions, but no matter what, those questions are there beneath the surface,” Dr. Healy notes. “There’s no replacement for a real encounter with God’s power and the holiness of his people.”

Indeed, Barna studies have shown that personal connections to Christians can be even more impactful than experiences with the Church at large. Dr. Healy concludes, “I’ve seen again and again that when we are willing to take risks in faith as we evangelize, the Lord backs us up through the power of the Holy Spirit. The gospel is a message in words that addresses the human being’s capacity for truth, but it is also a message of power that brings people into a personal encounter with Jesus.”

This article was written using tracking data from Barna’s FaithView tool and research published in Reviving Evangelism, a Barna study conducted in partnership with Alpha USA. Subscribe to FaithView to discover current statistics relevant to your area, region or the nation. Purchase a copy of Reviving Evangelism to learn about the state of evangelism in America and compare the faith-sharing experiences of Christians and non-Christians

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

The post Tracking the Growth and Decline of Religious Segments: The Rise of Atheism appeared first on Barna Group.

Tracking the Growth and Decline of Religious Segments: The Rise of Atheism

Barna - Tue, 14/01/2020 - 6:00pm

For over 30 years, the Church has trusted Barna’s data and insights to help leaders know their city and effectively minister within their context. While in years past Barna offered printed reports on cities, states and the nation, all of this data plus more is now housed on FaithView, an online Barna tool that allows subscribers to sort, filter and extract custom data specific to their mission and relevant to their area.

One of FaithView’s key features is data tracking, offering users a look at religious trends recorded by Barna over the last 18 years and providing invaluable insights into the growth and decline of various segmentations, whether filtered by generation, denomination, faith segments and more.

In recent reports, Barna (and other researchers) have noted that Christianity is on a steady decline while Americans’ identification with atheism continues to increase. Barna tracking data show that in 2003, just a little over one in 10 Americans claimed to be atheist, agnostic or of no religion (“none”) (11%), while over eight in 10 identified as Christian (across Barna’s faith segments, this included 7% evangelicals, 33% non-evangelical born again and 41% nominal Christians) and less than one in 10 affiliated with other faiths (8%).

Percentage points for all religious segments saw little to no shift over a decade, from 2003 to 2012—but by 2018, Christianity in the United States had witnessed a significant loss of followers, from 81 percent in 2003 to 72 percent in 2018. Meanwhile, the atheist / agnostic / none segment has seen the greatest increase of all groups analyzed, nearly doubling in size from 11 percent in 2003 to 21 percent in 2018.

Note: FaithView tracking data offers analytics in three-year bundles, as seen in the chart above, with the last year included in the bundled labeling the group. This allows Barna to offer a more robust sample size and effectively note data trends and changes over the years.

So, what is leading Americans to shy away from not only Christianity but other religions as well?

Barna has identified a number of trends that might attribute to this move toward secularization, which may spark concern for the spiritual well-being of the next generation. Among young adults, Gen Z teens are much less likely to assert religious identity than generations before them; some of the rise in atheism could be attributed to Gen Z entering adulthood, and the fact that they are, thus far, significantly more likely than older generations to claim no faith. Additionally, faith-sharing is falling out of favor with younger adults, even religious ones; almost half of practicing Christian Millennials (47%) believe that evangelism is wrong. Across the generations, three in 10 Gen X (27%) and one in five Boomers (19%) and Elders (20%) share this sentiment.

In a Q&A published in Reviving Evangelism, a Barna report conducted in partnership with Alpha USA, Dr. Mary Healy, Professor of Scripture at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, notes, “Many people in our time are affected by a kind of spiritual numbness. Beginning from childhood, they’ve been overstimulated, over-scheduled, over-indulged and overexposed to sexual content. They’ve been taught that self-fulfillment, sexual freedom and economic success are the highest values. So, they often seem to have lost interest in the most important questions of life: Why do I exist? What is my mission in life and how do I fulfill it? What is true love and how do I find it?”

“Many people today show indifference to these deeper questions, but no matter what, those questions are there beneath the surface,” Dr. Healy notes. “There’s no replacement for a real encounter with God’s power and the holiness of his people.”

Indeed, Barna studies have shown that personal connections to Christians can be even more impactful than experiences with the Church at large. Dr. Healy concludes, “I’ve seen again and again that when we are willing to take risks in faith as we evangelize, the Lord backs us up through the power of the Holy Spirit. The gospel is a message in words that addresses the human being’s capacity for truth, but it is also a message of power that brings people into a personal encounter with Jesus.”

This article was written using tracking data from Barna’s FaithView tool and research published in Reviving Evangelism, a Barna study conducted in partnership with Alpha USA. Subscribe to FaithView to discover current statistics relevant to your area, region or the nation. Purchase a copy of Reviving Evangelism to learn about the state of evangelism in America and compare the faith-sharing experiences of Christians and non-Christians

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

The post Tracking the Growth and Decline of Religious Segments: The Rise of Atheism appeared first on Barna Group.

Another Look at The Connected Generation: U.S. Country Report Now Available

Barna Blog - Fri, 10/01/2020 - 3:03am

Barna’s largest project yet, The Connected Generation, conducted in partnership with World Vision, includes survey responses from 15,369 individuals in 25 countries and nine languages, offering faith leaders both a broader and more focused lens with which to understand young adults. While The Connected Generation gives a global overview of 18–35-year-olds around the world, Barna also set out to provide more specific profiles of the regions and nations surveyed for this project. These reports offer localized insights on the connectivity levels and religious disposition of Millennials and Gen Z in the 25 countries included in The Connected Generation, building upon the themes explored at a global level.

Through country-specific data and analysis, expert commentary and actionable field guides, the country reports help faith leaders begin to apply the research in their local ministries and communities. The United States report, now available, adds global comparisons and new dimensions to Barna’s decades of research on the state of faith in America. Featured contributors include pastors and leaders such as Sam Collier, Jeanne Stevens, Eugene Cho, Jason Ballard and Edgar Sandoval, Sr.

These local snapshots from Barna’s largest study to date began rolling out in November 2019, as Barna president David Kinnaman joined World Vision and regional experts in Australia and New Zealand for a series of live events contextualizing the findings from the global study and the launch of the Australia / New Zealand country report.

What are leaders gleaning from these more focused findings and field guides?

“The Barna / World Vision partnership and subsequent roadshow was a unique experience for World Vision in NZ,” says Jonathan Fletcher, Head of Partnerships and Community Growth for World Vision New Zealand. “We were able to support and enhance the mission of the church in ways many didn’t expect.  As an expression of the church, we need the Church to be healthy and growing.  The insights from the research were alarming, but David Kinnaman’s ability to communicate them in ways that were tangible, and hopeful were profound.  Christian leaders of every denomination were left with an awareness of the enormity of the challenge but equipped with tools and inspired with hope to arrest its inevitability.”

“Christian leaders owe a big ‘thank you’ to Barna and World Vision for providing data that backs up what many of us suspected: Millennials are leaving the Church (or staying well clear of) in even greater numbers than their parents did,” adds Sam Bloore, Senior Teaching Fellow and Residential Host for Venn Foundation. “But we owe perhaps the biggest ‘thank you’ to those Millennials themselves, who have had the spiritual and emotional honesty to give us a timely warning that much of our church activity and focus has drifted away from that which produces resilient disciples of Jesus. The silver lining to the data is that the slow, unsexy work of discipleship—that allows the depth and richness of the gospel to work its way into and through a whole life—does still work! Just as it has for over 2000 years.” 

For more information on country reports or to view analysis for your area, visit theconnectedgeneration.com, which will be updated throughout the year as more country reports are released. Visit the Barna shop to order your own copy of a country report.

If you haven’t already, watch the Faith for the Future webcast (available for free replay until March 1, 2020) to discover more key findings from The Connected Generation study. You can purchase the report or access a suite of related resources at theconnectedgeneration.com.

The post Another Look at The Connected Generation: U.S. Country Report Now Available appeared first on Barna Group.

Another Look at The Connected Generation: U.S. Country Report Now Available

Barna - Fri, 10/01/2020 - 3:03am

Barna’s largest project yet, The Connected Generation, conducted in partnership with World Vision, includes survey responses from 15,369 individuals in 25 countries and nine languages, offering faith leaders both a broader and more focused lens with which to understand young adults. While The Connected Generation gives a global overview of 18–35-year-olds around the world, Barna also set out to provide more specific profiles of the regions and nations surveyed for this project. These reports offer localized insights on the connectivity levels and religious disposition of Millennials and Gen Z in the 25 countries included in The Connected Generation, building upon the themes explored at a global level.

Through country-specific data and analysis, expert commentary and actionable field guides, the country reports help faith leaders begin to apply the research in their local ministries and communities. The United States report, now available, adds global comparisons and new dimensions to Barna’s decades of research on the state of faith in America. Featured contributors include pastors and leaders such as Sam Collier, Jeanne Stevens, Eugene Cho, Jason Ballard and Edgar Sandoval, Sr.

These local snapshots from Barna’s largest study to date began rolling out in November 2019, as Barna president David Kinnaman joined World Vision and regional experts in Australia and New Zealand for a series of live events contextualizing the findings from the global study and the launch of the Australia / New Zealand country report.

What are leaders gleaning from these more focused findings and field guides?

“The Barna / World Vision partnership and subsequent roadshow was a unique experience for World Vision in NZ,” says Jonathan Fletcher, Head of Partnerships and Community Growth for World Vision New Zealand. “We were able to support and enhance the mission of the church in ways many didn’t expect.  As an expression of the church, we need the Church to be healthy and growing.  The insights from the research were alarming, but David Kinnaman’s ability to communicate them in ways that were tangible, and hopeful were profound.  Christian leaders of every denomination were left with an awareness of the enormity of the challenge but equipped with tools and inspired with hope to arrest its inevitability.”

“Christian leaders owe a big ‘thank you’ to Barna and World Vision for providing data that backs up what many of us suspected: Millennials are leaving the Church (or staying well clear of) in even greater numbers than their parents did,” adds Sam Bloore, Senior Teaching Fellow and Residential Host for Venn Foundation. “But we owe perhaps the biggest ‘thank you’ to those Millennials themselves, who have had the spiritual and emotional honesty to give us a timely warning that much of our church activity and focus has drifted away from that which produces resilient disciples of Jesus. The silver lining to the data is that the slow, unsexy work of discipleship—that allows the depth and richness of the gospel to work its way into and through a whole life—does still work! Just as it has for over 2000 years.” 

For more information on country reports or to view analysis for your area, visit theconnectedgeneration.com, which will be updated throughout the year as more country reports are released. Visit the Barna shop to order your own copy of a country report.

If you haven’t already, watch the Faith for the Future webcast (available for free replay until March 1, 2020) to discover more key findings from The Connected Generation study. You can purchase the report or access a suite of related resources at theconnectedgeneration.com.

The post Another Look at The Connected Generation: U.S. Country Report Now Available appeared first on Barna Group.

12 Stats of Christmas

McCrindle - Tue, 24/12/2019 - 10:00am

The post 12 Stats of Christmas appeared first on McCrindle.

Appendix

Pew Research - Wed, 18/12/2019 - 3:56am

The post Appendix appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Methodology

Pew Research - Wed, 18/12/2019 - 3:56am

The American Trends Panel survey methodology Most of the analysis in this report is based on a survey conducted September 3 to September 15, 2019, on Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel. Some analysis of long-term phone trends includes a telephone survey conducted September 5 through September 16, 2019. The American Trends Panel (ATP), created […]

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7. Domestic policy: Taxes, environment, health care

Pew Research - Wed, 18/12/2019 - 3:56am

Most Americans have doubts about the fairness of the federal tax system. About six-in-ten (62%) describe the current tax system as either not too fair (39%) or not at all fair (23%). About a third describe the system as moderately fair (35%) and just 2% say it is very fair. Overall views of the tax […]

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6. Views of foreign policy

Pew Research - Wed, 18/12/2019 - 3:56am

Roughly seven-in-ten Americans (73%) say that good diplomacy is the best way to ensure peace, while 26% say that military strength is the best way to do this. By a similar margin, more Americans say the U.S. should take the interests of allies into account, even if it means making compromises, than think the U.S. […]

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5. Gender, family and marriage, same-sex marriage and religion

Pew Research - Wed, 18/12/2019 - 3:56am

Americans generally believe that women continue to face obstacles that make it more difficult for them to get ahead than men. While there are sizable gender differences in these opinions, the partisan divide is even more pronounced. Overall, 57% of adults say that “significant obstacles still make it harder for women to get ahead than […]

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4. Views on race and immigration

Pew Research - Wed, 18/12/2019 - 3:56am

Some of the starkest partisan divides on political values are seen in views about race and immigration: Democrats are substantially more likely than Republicans to say that the country has not gone far enough to give black people equal rights and that white people benefit from societal advantages that black people do not have. Democrats […]

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