Research from other organisations

1. Many in U.S. see religious organizations as forces for good, but prefer them to stay out of politics

Pew Research - Sat, 16/11/2019 - 3:57am

Americans largely have positive feelings about the role religion plays in American life. A slim majority of U.S. adults say religious organizations do more good than harm in American society, while just one-in-five say they do more harm than good. Specifically, roughly half of Americans give religious organizations high marks when it comes to strengthening […]

The post 1. Many in U.S. see religious organizations as forces for good, but prefer them to stay out of politics appeared first on Pew Research Center.

2. Most congregants trust clergy to give advice about religious issues, fewer trust clergy on personal matters

Pew Research - Sat, 16/11/2019 - 3:56am

A majority of U.S. adults think religious leaders have high or very high ethical standards (65%). And among those who attend religious services at least a few times a year, an even larger share have similarly positive ratings about the ethical behavior of the clergy at their congregation (88%). The survey also finds that a […]

The post 2. Most congregants trust clergy to give advice about religious issues, fewer trust clergy on personal matters appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Methodology

Pew Research - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:53am

Estimates presented in this report for Europe’s unauthorized immigrant population are for the size of this population residing in the European Union (all 28 countries, including the United Kingdom) and European Free Trade Association countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), a total of 32 European nations. Estimates are presented for the end of each year, […]

The post Methodology appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Appendix A: Nationalities by regional classification

Pew Research - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:53am

Five regions for the nationality of unauthorized immigrants are used in this report. They come from two different data sources: (1) labor force surveys and (2) asylum seeker data for those with pending decisions. A single asterisk (*) indicates a country or territory that appears in the country list of regions coded in labor force […]

The post Appendix A: Nationalities by regional classification appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Appendix D: References

Pew Research - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:53am

Ahlander, Johan and Mansoor Yosufzai. July 13, 2017. “Sweden intensifies crackdown on illegal immigrants.” Reuters. Albano, Alessandro, Veronica Corsini and Andrea Gereöffy. 2015. “Demographic statistics: A review of definitions and methods of collection in 44 European countries.” Annunziata, Marco. April 14, 2018. “Twenty years and nothing to show for it: Italy’s broken economic model.” Forbes. […]

The post Appendix D: References appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Acknowledgments

Pew Research - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:53am

This report was written by Phillip Connor, Senior Researcher, and Jeffrey S. Passel, Senior Demographer. Editorial guidance was provided by Mark Hugo Lopez, Director of Global Migration and Demography Research; Neil G. Ruiz, Associate Director of Global Migration and Demography Research; James Bell, Vice President of Global Strategy; D’Vera Cohn, Senior Writer and Editor; and […]

The post Acknowledgments appeared first on Pew Research Center.

2. The origins, time in country and demographics of unauthorized immigrants in Europe

Pew Research - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:53am

Unauthorized immigrants residing in Europe in 2017 were from a diverse set of origin countries, had lived in Europe for a relatively short period of time and were relatively young. More than half were male. Our estimates of characteristics of unauthorized immigrants in Europe do not cover the entire population because of data limitations, but […]

The post 2. The origins, time in country and demographics of unauthorized immigrants in Europe appeared first on Pew Research Center.

1.  Four countries account for the majority of Europe’s unauthorized immigrant population

Pew Research - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:53am

While each of the 32 nations in the EU and EFTA had some unauthorized immigrants in 2017, the largest numbers were in Germany and the United Kingdom, amounting to about half of Europe’s total. Substantial shares also lived in Italy and France. Together, these four countries were home to more than two-thirds (70%) of Europe’s […]

The post 1.  Four countries account for the majority of Europe’s unauthorized immigrant population appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Summary of findings: Europe’s Unauthorized Immigrant Population Peaks in 2016, Then Levels Off

Pew Research - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:50am

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Nov. 13, 2019) – At least 3.9 million unauthorized immigrants – and possibly as many as 4.8 million – lived in Europe in 2017, according to new Pew Research Center estimates. These totals are up from Center estimates for 2014, when between 3.0 million and 3.7 million unauthorized migrants resided in European nations, […]

The post Summary of findings: Europe’s Unauthorized Immigrant Population Peaks in 2016, Then Levels Off appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Barna Takes: Using Research to Counter Millennial Stereotypes

Barna Blog - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:22am

There are plenty of conflicting stereotypes about Millennials: Are we the laziest generation or the hardest working? The most entitled or the most open-handed? The least religious or the most devout in new, misunderstood ways? The most connected or the least connected?

When we started The Connected Generation, we referred to it internally as “the global Millennials study.” It was presented to me as an opportunity to understand, test and, as needed, affirm or reject the messages we so often hear about the Millennial generation—my generation. This was one of my first projects since completing grad school and joining Barna Group, and I did not take this opportunity lightly. Working alongside our research partners at World Vision, under the guidance of David Kinnaman and with the greatest coworkers I could imagine, I was privileged to be the lead researcher and help create a first-of-its-kind study that would well represent this closely observed yet still misunderstood collection of young adults: The Connected Generation.

To be successful in this study, the first thing I had to do was push past preconceptions about the Millennial mindset and definition. As an Australian church leader reminded us during the early weeks of our work, the term “Millennial” has a lot of American connotations too often projected onto other nations. Similarly, given my background in sociology, I have always thought of my Millennial status as a bit of a dual personality. Which of my interests and qualities are innately mine, and which are products or projections of society? Is my daily, diagnosed battle with functional depression unique to me, or is it connected to the time and place in which I have been raised (or, perhaps, is it both)?

My job sometimes involves using data to separate stereotypes from truth, and being a Millennial sometimes feels like living in between the two. For me personally, it means fighting for what I love (OK, even if that includes vinyl records and avocado toast) just as much as it means rejecting the assumptions of laziness, self-righteousness and entitlement placed upon me by other generations. It means finding comfort in the fact that nearly a quarter of 18-to-35-year-olds around the world told us that they often feel “lonely and isolated from others,” reassuring me that I am not alone in my own struggles.

After 15,000+ online interviews across 25 countries in 9 languages, our team dug deeper into the truths about Millennials and their friends in the leading edge of Gen Z (specifically, adults ages 18 to 35). We produced a printed study of our key findings, debuted the research through a live webcast and crafted country reports that offer an opportunity for us to share a story of hope with church leaders around the world. It’s because of the latter that, in October of 2019—almost a year after the study’s conception—I presented findings from The Connected Generation to a group of just over 100 church leaders in Singapore. While the gathering in Singapore seemed small, it was incredibly symbolic and a reminder of the variety of experiences we had fought to capture through our research. I started my presentation by reminding attendees that while I may be the expert of this international study, they are the experts on faith leadership and young adults in their country. The church leaders attended not because someone from Barna Group traveled across the world to speak with them, but rather because someone had robust, representative data about young adults in their nation. No projections or stereotypes.

All of these experiences—conducting the research, being on the publication team, speaking on a panel for our Faith for the Future webcast, producing regional reports and traveling to Asia—have greatly impacted my view of Millennials. The Connected Generation has been an incredible opportunity to learn about not just the effects of global hyper-connectivity, but also the beautiful, diverse expressions of Christians around the world, within a single generation. Just as I charge this research to re-invent the generational narrative, I also have a healthier understanding of where I stand within it. Just as I reject some of the assumptions about my age group, I also now confidently embrace the story of a passionate, hopeful and resilient generation.

The post Barna Takes: Using Research to Counter Millennial Stereotypes appeared first on Barna Group.

Barna Takes: Using Research to Counter Millennial Stereotypes

Barna - Thu, 14/11/2019 - 3:22am

There are plenty of conflicting stereotypes about Millennials: Are we the laziest generation or the hardest working? The most entitled or the most open-handed? The least religious or the most devout in new, misunderstood ways? The most connected or the least connected?

When we started The Connected Generation, we referred to it internally as “the global Millennials study.” It was presented to me as an opportunity to understand, test and, as needed, affirm or reject the messages we so often hear about the Millennial generation—my generation. This was one of my first projects since completing grad school and joining Barna Group, and I did not take this opportunity lightly. Working alongside our research partners at World Vision, under the guidance of David Kinnaman and with the greatest coworkers I could imagine, I was privileged to be the lead researcher and help create a first-of-its-kind study that would well represent this closely observed yet still misunderstood collection of young adults: The Connected Generation.

To be successful in this study, the first thing I had to do was push past preconceptions about the Millennial mindset and definition. As an Australian church leader reminded us during the early weeks of our work, the term “Millennial” has a lot of American connotations too often projected onto other nations. Similarly, given my background in sociology, I have always thought of my Millennial status as a bit of a dual personality. Which of my interests and qualities are innately mine, and which are products or projections of society? Is my daily, diagnosed battle with functional depression unique to me, or is it connected to the time and place in which I have been raised (or, perhaps, is it both)?

My job sometimes involves using data to separate stereotypes from truth, and being a Millennial sometimes feels like living in between the two. For me personally, it means fighting for what I love (OK, even if that includes vinyl records and avocado toast) just as much as it means rejecting the assumptions of laziness, self-righteousness and entitlement placed upon me by other generations. It means finding comfort in the fact that nearly a quarter of 18-to-35-year-olds around the world told us that they often feel “lonely and isolated from others,” reassuring me that I am not alone in my own struggles.

After 15,000+ online interviews across 25 countries in 9 languages, our team dug deeper into the truths about Millennials and their friends in the leading edge of Gen Z (specifically, adults ages 18 to 35). We produced a printed study of our key findings, debuted the research through a live webcast and crafted country reports that offer an opportunity for us to share a story of hope with church leaders around the world. It’s because of the latter that, in October of 2019—almost a year after the study’s conception—I presented findings from The Connected Generation to a group of just over 100 church leaders in Singapore. While the gathering in Singapore seemed small, it was incredibly symbolic and a reminder of the variety of experiences we had fought to capture through our research. I started my presentation by reminding attendees that while I may be the expert of this international study, they are the experts on faith leadership and young adults in their country. The church leaders attended not because someone from Barna Group traveled across the world to speak with them, but rather because someone had robust, representative data about young adults in their nation. No projections or stereotypes.

All of these experiences—conducting the research, being on the publication team, speaking on a panel for our Faith for the Future webcast, producing regional reports and traveling to Asia—have greatly impacted my view of Millennials. The Connected Generation has been an incredible opportunity to learn about not just the effects of global hyper-connectivity, but also the beautiful, diverse expressions of Christians around the world, within a single generation. Just as I charge this research to re-invent the generational narrative, I also have a healthier understanding of where I stand within it. Just as I reject some of the assumptions about my age group, I also now confidently embrace the story of a passionate, hopeful and resilient generation.

The post Barna Takes: Using Research to Counter Millennial Stereotypes appeared first on Barna Group.

Marriage and Cohabitation in the U.S.

Pew Research - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 3:51am

As more U.S. adults are delaying marriage – or forgoing it altogether – the share who have ever lived with an unmarried partner has been on the rise.

The post Marriage and Cohabitation in the U.S. appeared first on Pew Research Center.

4. How married and cohabiting adults see their relationships

Pew Research - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 3:30am

Married adults are more satisfied in general with their relationship than are those who are living with a partner. And they express higher levels of satisfaction with several specific aspects of their relationship. In addition, those who are married are more likely than those who are cohabiting to say they have a great deal of […]

The post 4. How married and cohabiting adults see their relationships appeared first on Pew Research Center.

3. Why people get married or move in with a partner

Pew Research - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 3:30am

The decision to get married or to move in with a partner is a personal one, but for most married and cohabiting adults, love and companionship trump other considerations, such as the desire to have children someday, convenience or finances. For a majority of those who are married – especially if they didn’t live with […]

The post 3. Why people get married or move in with a partner appeared first on Pew Research Center.

2. Public views of marriage and cohabitation

Pew Research - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 3:30am

Most Americans find it acceptable for an unmarried couple to live together, even if they don’t plan to get married. A majority also says that married and cohabiting couples can raise children equally well. At the same time, the public still sees societal benefits in marriage, and many say marriage is important, though not necessarily […]

The post 2. Public views of marriage and cohabitation appeared first on Pew Research Center.

1. The landscape of marriage and cohabitation in the U.S.

Pew Research - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 3:30am

The share of adults in the U.S. who are presently married remains far higher than the share cohabiting. However, an examination of their lifetime experiences, which captures past relationships as well as present ones, tells a different story: Among people ages 18 to 44, a larger share have cohabited at some point than have been […]

The post 1. The landscape of marriage and cohabitation in the U.S. appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Acknowledgments

Pew Research - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 3:30am

Pew Research Center received invaluable advice in developing the questionnaire from Philip N. Cohen, Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland; and Wendy D. Manning, Dr. Howard E. Aldrich and Penny Daum Aldrich Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Bowling Green State University. This report is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis […]

The post Acknowledgments appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Methodology

Pew Research - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 3:30am

The American Trends Panel survey methodology The American Trends Panel (ATP), created by Pew Research Center, is a nationally representative panel of randomly selected U.S. adults. Panelists participate via self-administered web surveys. Panelists who do not have internet access at home are provided with a tablet and wireless internet connection. The panel is being managed […]

The post Methodology appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Pages