Research from other organisations

Appendix A: Classifying European populist parties

Pew Research - Tue, 15/10/2019 - 9:22am

Classifying parties as populist Although experts generally agree that populist political leaders or parties display high levels of anti-elitism, definitions of populism vary. We use three measures to classify populist parties: anti-elite ratings from the 2017 Chapel Hill Expert Survey (CHES), Inglehart and Norris’s populism party scale and The PopuList. We define a party as […]

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5. National conditions

Pew Research - Tue, 15/10/2019 - 9:22am

Half or more say they are dissatisfied with the way things are going in their country today in nine of the countries surveyed, a pattern that is mirrored in the U.S. In Greece, Bulgaria and the UK, about three-quarters or more are dissatisfied with the direction of their country, and roughly two-thirds or more are […]

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8. Political parties

Pew Research - Tue, 15/10/2019 - 9:22am

Across the 14 European Union countries surveyed, few express positive views of political parties. Only six parties (of the 59 tested) are seen favorably by half or more of the population. Populist parties across Europe also receive largely poor reviews. Of the 21 populist parties asked about in the survey, only six receive positive reviews […]

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Acknowledgments

Pew Research - Tue, 15/10/2019 - 9:22am

This report is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis of the following individuals. Richard Wike, Director, Global Attitudes Research Jacob Poushter, Associate Director, Global Attitudes Research Laura Silver, Senior Researcher Alexandra Castillo, Research Associate Kat Devlin, Research Associate Janell Fetterolf, Research Associate Moira Fagan, Research Analyst Christine Huang, Research Assistant Christine Tamir, […]

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6. Minority groups

Pew Research - Tue, 15/10/2019 - 9:22am

There is a wide divergence across Europe in attitudes toward Muslims. Generally, more favorable views of Muslims exist in Western Europe, Russia and Ukraine while more negative attitudes persist in Southern, Central and Eastern Europe. Solid majorities of people in the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, Germany and Sweden have positive opinions of Muslims in […]

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Barna Takes: Peace for an Anxiety-Ridden Generation

Barna Blog - Tue, 15/10/2019 - 6:29am

Whenever Barna releases findings from a study, one of our aims is that it might be easy to glimpse the person behind the percentage. Our goal is that readers wouldn’t engage with the findings from a distance, but would be able to recognize their neighbors, their congregations, their families—and, yes, themselves—in the research. That can be an aha moment, when the numbers and tables become animated by one’s context, and that’s when, we hope, the research might be turned into action.

Our own team is not immune to this effect. I’d have to try hard to not see myself in the work. Some examples from recent projects and partnerships: For our Households of Faith study, I was challenged to find myself represented among the “couple households,” a comfortable group that, the data suggest, have to be quite intentional about incorporating spiritual rhythms and hospitality into their routines. In our Christians at Work report, I was heartened to align myself with ambitious Millennials who want to find their callings and infuse their careers with meaning. Most recently, The Connected Generation—Barna’s largest project yet—inevitably became an introspective effort for myself and some of my Millennial and Gen Z coworkers, as we partnered with World Vision to survey 15,000+ of our generational peers (18–35-year-olds) in 25 countries around the world.

One of the major findings from this international study struck but did not surprise me: Young adults today are, well, a little tense. Anxiety about important decisions, uncertainty about the future and fear of failure are among respondents’ most commonly reported emotions. These worries are often tied up in vocation, relationship status or financial means—all things that tend to be unsettled for this age group. Near-constant connection to and emotional investment in what’s going on around the world is a defining trait of my generation, but more personal, supportive connections aren’t quite so common; only one in three young adults feels someone deeply cares for or believes in them. People of faith may experience stronger community or well-being, the data show—but Barna has long documented this generations’ barriers to belief, including questions about human suffering or a feeling that communities of worship just aren’t appropriately speaking to big issues or daily life.

In short: I get it. Anxiety has been a pattern throughout my life, growing more pronounced in my adulthood. Beyond trying to crack the mystery of my mental health, when I look at my relationship to others, to the news, to productivity, to sleep and to devices, I can acknowledge the ways this digital age and my own age might aggravate the condition. Staring down, treating and learning to deal with my anxiety is a day-to-day effort, at times an urgent one. So I, too, have been disappointed on the occasions when I’ve witnessed people in the Church fumble discussions about anxiety, or shrug off a “generational angst” without delving into some of the issues (spiritual, psychological, societal, etc.) that might fuel it.

Thankfully, I can also attest to the power and relief of being in faith communities that have addressed these topics well—thoroughly, compassionately, holistically. One example comes from my own father, a pastor in Florida, who did a series of teachings on anxiety earlier this year. After validating the subject from the pulpit over multiple weeks, the church provided attendees with booklets including scriptures, readings and resources to take home and return to.

And I’ll never forget a Lenten service at my church in Nashville last year in which, in lieu of a sermon, we spent the morning meditating on and singing of peace—as well as its absence. We were asked to ponder: What is peace? Do we believe it is even possible today, as we consider the headlines, as we weather the storms in our own lives, in the nation and around the world? The service didn’t rush to feel-good messages or quick fixes. Instead, it allowed room for us to sit in silence, which was challenging at points. But I left feeling less alone. No small thing, the research tells us.

Working on this study, it was difficult to chronicle—and relate to—the doubts, isolation and anxiety plaguing many young adults around the world. I can understand that some might feel an urge to either despair over or dismiss these uncomfortable realities. But I hope faith leaders can go deeper, and young adults like myself need them to. More than disembodied data, these findings represent the experiences of the bulk of a generation—and act as reminders to receive and make the peace we are offered in Christ, the kind we’re told exceeds our understanding and guards our hearts and minds.

The post Barna Takes: Peace for an Anxiety-Ridden Generation appeared first on Barna Group.

Barna Takes: Peace for an Anxiety-Ridden Generation

Barna - Tue, 15/10/2019 - 6:29am

Whenever Barna releases findings from a study, one of our aims is that it might be easy to glimpse the person behind the percentage. Our goal is that readers wouldn’t engage with the findings from a distance, but would be able to recognize their neighbors, their congregations, their families—and, yes, themselves—in the research. That can be an aha moment, when the numbers and tables become animated by one’s context, and that’s when, we hope, the research might be turned into action.

Our own team is not immune to this effect. I’d have to try hard to not see myself in the work. Some examples from recent projects and partnerships: For our Households of Faith study, I was challenged to find myself represented among the “couple households,” a comfortable group that, the data suggest, have to be quite intentional about incorporating spiritual rhythms and hospitality into their routines. In our Christians at Work report, I was heartened to align myself with ambitious Millennials who want to find their callings and infuse their careers with meaning. Most recently, The Connected Generation—Barna’s largest project yet—inevitably became an introspective effort for myself and some of my Millennial and Gen Z coworkers, as we partnered with World Vision to survey 15,000+ of our generational peers (18–35-year-olds) in 25 countries around the world.

One of the major findings from this international study struck, but did not surprise, me: Young adults today are, well, a little tense. Anxiety about important decisions, uncertainty about the future and fear of failure are among respondents’ most commonly reported emotions. These worries are often tied up in vocation, relationship status or financial means—all things that tend to be unsettled for this age group. Near-constant connection to and emotional investment in what’s going on around the world is a defining trait of my generation, but more personal, supportive connections aren’t quite so common; only one in three young adults feels someone deeply cares for or believes in them. People of faith may experience stronger community or well-being, the data show—but Barna has long documented this generations’ barriers to belief, including questions about human suffering or a feeling that communities of worship just aren’t appropriately speaking to big issues or daily life.

In short: I get it. Anxiety has been a pattern throughout my life, growing more pronounced in my adulthood. Beyond trying to crack the mystery of my mental health, when I look at my relationship to others, to the news, to productivity, to sleep and to devices, I can acknowledge the ways this digital age and my own age might aggravate the condition. Staring down, treating and learning to deal with my anxiety is a day-to-day effort, at times an urgent one. So I, too, have been disappointed on the occasions when I’ve witnessed people in the Church fumble discussions about anxiety, or shrug off a “generational angst” without delving into some of the issues (spiritual, psychological, societal, etc.) that might fuel it.

Thankfully, I can also attest to the power and relief of being in faith communities that have addressed these topics well—thoroughly, compassionately, holistically. One example comes from my own father, a pastor in Florida, who did a series of teachings on anxiety earlier this year. After validating the subject from the pulpit over multiple weeks, the church provided attendees with booklets including scriptures, readings and resources to take home and return to.

And I’ll never forget a Lenten service at my church in Nashville last year in which, in lieu of a sermon, we spent the morning meditating on and singing of peace—as well as its absence. We were asked to ponder: What is peace? Do we believe it is even possible today, as we consider the headlines, as we weather the storms in our own lives, in the nation and around the world? The service didn’t rush to feel-good messages or quick fixes. Instead, it allowed room for us to sit in silence, which was challenging at points. But I left feeling less alone. No small thing, the research tells us.

Working on this study, it was difficult to chronicle—and relate to—the doubts, isolation and anxiety plaguing many young adults around the world. I can understand that some might feel an urge to either despair over or dismiss these uncomfortable realities. But I hope faith leaders can go deeper, and young adults like myself need them to. More than disembodied data, these findings represent the experiences of the bulk of a generation—and act as reminders to receive and make the peace we are offered in Christ, the kind we’re told passes understanding and guards our hearts and minds.

The post Barna Takes: Peace for an Anxiety-Ridden Generation appeared first on Barna Group.

Pray for Jill Kinnaman

Barna Blog - Sat, 12/10/2019 - 12:30pm

Friends of Barna:

Many of you may remember when Barna president David Kinnaman’s wife, Jill, was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2017. Since completing her treatment, Jill has had regular MRIs to monitor any changes, and she’s been sailing along with nothing to report.

This week, however, Jill’s scan showed two small areas of tumor growth on the left side (her previous tumor was on the right hemisphere). We are so thankful for those regularly scheduled MRIs! Jill has had no symptoms to indicate any change, so the scan has made it possible for the oncologist to detect cellular changes at an early stage. In fact, the doctor has cleared her to go on a long-awaited trip to Australia and New Zealand this month with David and their son, Zack.

Would you pray with us for Jill, David and the whole Kinnaman family? Pray for their precious time together on this once-in-a-lifetime trip, that they would comfort and encourage each other—and have some epic fun! Pray for wisdom as they decide with Jill’s doctors what course of treatment to take. Pray that they draw close to Jesus and seek him at every step, especially when the way isn’t clear.

Thank you for walking alongside the Kinnaman family and the Barna team as we follow Jesus through this season! As you might expect, David and Jill will be focused on her treatment and their kids, so please check the website www.prayforJill.com for updates from the family.

Thank you for praying.

Sincere thanks,

The Barna team

The post Pray for Jill Kinnaman appeared first on Barna Group.

Pray for Jill Kinnaman

Barna - Sat, 12/10/2019 - 12:30pm

Friends of Barna:

Many of you may remember when Barna president David Kinnaman’s wife, Jill, was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2017. Since completing her treatment, Jill has had regular MRIs to monitor any changes, and she’s been sailing along with nothing to report.

This week, however, Jill’s scan showed two small areas of tumor growth on the left side (her previous tumor was on the right hemisphere). We are so thankful for those regularly scheduled MRIs! Jill has had no symptoms to indicate any change, so the scan has made it possible for the oncologist to detect cellular changes at an early stage. In fact, the doctor has cleared her to go on a long-awaited trip to Australia and New Zealand this month with David and their son, Zack.

Would you pray with us for Jill, David and the whole Kinnaman family? Pray for their precious time together on this once-in-a-lifetime trip, that they would comfort and encourage each other—and have some epic fun! Pray for wisdom as they decide with Jill’s doctors what course of treatment to take. Pray that they draw close to Jesus and seek him at every step, especially when the way isn’t clear.

Thank you for walking alongside the Kinnaman family and the Barna team as we follow Jesus through this season! As you might expect, David and Jill will be focused on her treatment and their kids, so please check the website www.prayforJill.com for updates from the family.

Thank you for praying.

Sincere thanks,

The Barna team

The post Pray for Jill Kinnaman appeared first on Barna Group.

Partisan Antipathy: More Intense, More Personal

Pew Research - Fri, 11/10/2019 - 7:01am

Division and animosity between the two political parties in the U.S. has deepened. Most partisans view the other side as ‘closed-minded’; Republicans see Democrats as ‘unpatriotic.'

The post Partisan Antipathy: More Intense, More Personal appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Methodology

Pew Research - Fri, 11/10/2019 - 7:00am

The American Trends Panel survey methodology The American Trends Panel (ATP), created by Pew Research Center, is a nationally representative panel of randomly selected U.S. adults. Panelists participate via self-administered web surveys. Panelists who do not have internet access at home are provided with a tablet and wireless internet connection. The panel is being managed […]

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2. How partisans view each other

Pew Research - Fri, 11/10/2019 - 7:00am

Large shares of Republicans and Democrats associate several negative traits with members of the other party. Wide majorities in both parties – three-quarters of Democrats (75%) and 64% of Republicans – say those in the other party are more closed-minded than other Americans. And 55% of Republicans and 47% of Democrats view members of the […]

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1. The partisan landscape and views of the parties

Pew Research - Fri, 11/10/2019 - 7:00am

Republicans and Democrats agree on very little in the current political environment, but there is a widespread belief in both parties that partisan divisions in the country are increasing. Among the public overall, 78% say divisions between Republicans and Democrats in this country are increasing, while just 6% say they are decreasing and 16% say […]

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Acknowledgments

Pew Research - Thu, 10/10/2019 - 3:10am

This report is a collaborative effort based on the input and analysis of the following individuals. Find related reports online at pewresearch.org/internet. Primary researchers Emily A. Vogels, Research Associate Monica Anderson, Associate Director Research team Aaron Smith, Director, Data Labs Lee Rainie, Director, Internet and Technology Research Skye Toor, Data Science Assistant Brooke Auxier, Research […]

The post Acknowledgments appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Methodology

Pew Research - Thu, 10/10/2019 - 3:10am

The American Trends Panel survey methodology The American Trends Panel (ATP), created by Pew Research Center, is a nationally representative panel of randomly selected U.S. adults. Panelists participate via self-administered web surveys. Panelists who do not have internet access at home are provided with a tablet and wireless internet connection. The panel is being managed […]

The post Methodology appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Digital Knowledge Quiz

Pew Research - Thu, 10/10/2019 - 2:58am

Test your knowledge by taking our 10-question quiz about digital topics, then compare your score with other Americans who took the survey.

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Americans and Digital Knowledge

Pew Research - Thu, 10/10/2019 - 2:55am

A new Pew Research Center survey finds that Americans’ understanding of technology-related issues varies greatly depending on the topic, term or concept. While a majority of U.S. adults can correctly answer questions about phishing scams or website cookies, other items are more challenging. For example, just 28% of adults can identify an example of two-factor […]

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